Acupuncture + surgery = less pain, less drugs, less side effects

Duke University Medical Centre in North Carolina analysed the results of 15 clinical trials on the effectiveness of acupuncture. The researchers concluded that patients getting acupuncture before or during various types of operations had significantly less pain afterwards than patients who did not get acupuncture.

Acupuncture also reduced other side effects associated with the pain drugs and surgery. Acupuncture patients experienced 1.5 times lower rates of nausea, 1.6 times fewer reports of dizziness and 3.5 times fewer cases of urinary retention compared to patients had surgery and no acupuncture.

“The use of acupuncture is still very under-appreciated…” Dr. Tong-Joo Gan, vice chairman of Duke’s anaesthesiology department said in an interview to Reuters

The research was presented at a conference of the American Society for Anaesthesiology in San Francisco.

A study: acupuncture and massage significantly improve the well-being of cancer patients

A new Perth study has found acupuncture and massage significantly improve the well-being of cancer patients.

More than 500 patients in the study began using complementary treatments in addition to traditional medicine like chemotherapy and morphine over a 17-month period.

The researchers at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital found the therapies relieved physical symptoms such as nausea and pain, while improving the patient’s overall quality of life.

The director of the Cancer Support Centre, David Joske, says the treatments worked extremely well but more research needs to be done “to start to ask how can we get the best out of these two worlds which in the past really have been mutually exclusive in our society”.

He says he hopes the study gives greater credibility to the benefits of complementary medicine.

source: www.abc.net.au

Melbourne’s Northern Hospital embraces acupuncture

ELEANOR HALL: Now to the new face of emergency medicine in Australia. In a radical departure from accepted hospital practice across the nation, the Emergency Department at the Northern Hospital in Melbourne is incorporating ancient techniques into its new approach to care.

When patients arrive at casualty, they will now be treated with acupuncture to reduce symptoms such as pain and nausea. Final year acupuncture students at RMIT University will deliver the treatment, which will be used in conjunction with standard medical practice.

Read the article here